Drive-thru HEADSETS: McD's, BK, Wendy's, Coffee/Doughnut places, Compatible ?

154.49mhz.
Man we had fun with that freq.
And then the pedistal was on 30mhz or something.
No big deal for programmable scanner (or ham radio) owners.

There were only a handfull of drive thru headset frequencies.

Then the new headsets arrived. Not the UHF ones. The 900mhz hoppers.

I don’t know but my scanners couldnt find them anymore.
I tried looking for info, but no one knew anything.

I’m not sure if the 2.4 & 5.8’s was more of a wifi protocol version, or if there is FHSS allocated to those bands too.
(i’d hate to have to work shifts with a 2.4ghz transmitter on my head)

But now I have a hopper and wonder if these headsets are the same tech as the DLR/DTR stuff.
Could I listen ?

Does anyone service these headsets for the restaurants ?
Are there a few suppliers other than //\ ?

“Big Sports Football” games have //\ headsets and are “secure”.

A thousand other questions, but this is a start.

FHSS systems like these are not monitorable on any consumer grade receiver (i.e., scanner).

I’m not sure if the 2.4 & 5.8’s was more of a wifi protocol version, or if there is FHSS allocated to those bands too.
(i’d hate to have to work shifts with a 2.4ghz transmitter on my head)

FHSS is used on these bands in addition to other modulation types. Bluetooth operates in the 2.4GHz band and uses a hopset of 79 frequencies across the band. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) use the same 79 channels IIRC but is not a hopper. BLE operates at a lower power level and the FCC legal limit is lower because BLE is not a hopper.

But now I have a hopper and wonder if these headsets are the same tech as the DLR/DTR stuff.
Could I listen ?

Short answer: NO.

Longer answer: The headsets you mention are not compatible with the DLR/DTR protocol. The DTRs and DLRs are not monitorable on any consumer grade receiver (i.e., scanner) so don’t even bother trying. Even if the hopping were disabled and the radio transmitted on a single frequency in the hopset, you still won’t be able to listen. The digital modulation according to an 8-level modulation scheme is too wide for a narrowband receiver to accept plus you would still need to decode the VSELP digital. The only inexpensive and practical way to monitor DLRs and DTRs is to have one yourself (you already do!) AND it has to be programmed to the same hopset and talkgroup ID, and the correct 4 digit Profile ID Number (PIN). I am finding people are using them right out of the box at the factory default settings like FRS bubble packs. Defaulted DLRs and DTRs are easily monitorable with another DLR or DTR radio.

In your case, leave your DTR700 at the factory default setting and the 4 digit PIN at the 0000 default. You will find defaulted DLRs and DTRs if there are any in use in your area.

Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) information:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency-hopping_spread_spectrum